All posts filed under: health

Reboot and Reset with Bruce Sterling

Objects are printouts – not treasures, not things to stocpkpile. Our posessions are frozen social relationships. Think of them as hours of time and volumes of space. Reassess the objects in your space and time. What is most important?

selection of NZ Artisan honeys

Wild Thymes, Honey

I’ve been seduced by a terroirist network known as New Zealand Artisan Honey, made up of passionate beekeepers producing honeys in small, quality batches from specific varietal sources among some of New Zealand’s most spectactular locations.

What to Wear in NextCity

Tinfoil hats are so passé. So what should you wear to Faraday’s Cafe? Check out the latest collection of electromagnetic field blocking and “anti-identity theft” clothing at DDCLAB (427 W 14th St, New York NY 10014 map). Here’s the text from the windows: EMF: Electro Magnetic Field Block Anti•Identity•Theft•Fabric Electric Resistivity measure of how strongly a material opposes the flow of electric current and allows the movement of electrical charge. DDCLAB Woven of super sheer mesh polyester fibers coated with blackened copper, this high performance ultra thin, light weight and flexible mesh shield has a high ohm/sq resistivity that protects against identity theft by blocking high tech scanners from lifting valuable passport and ID information.

links for 2008-02-04

Unevenly Distributed: Production Models for the 21st Century Mark Pesce illuminates how the audience became not just the distributors but the producers of their own content, and have brought down the walls which separate pros from amateurs. Then he outlines the future: how the value of media is based on salience. (tags: mustread media production film television broadcast abundance hyperabundance salience digitalmedia distribution piracy wblcp) Kevin Kelly — The Technium — Better than Free When copies are free, you need to sell things which can not be copied. Well, what can’t be copied? First, trust. Eight more generatives (qualities that must be grown, generated, cultivated or nurtured) better than free: immediacy, personalization, interpretation, authenticity, accessibility, embodiment, patronage, findability. (tags: abundance generosity IP economy free digital) Great Firewall of China Faces Online Rebels (tags: censorship China internet politics firewall global) Illuminating Pollution - Pixelache Helsinki 08 From 2.22-29, 2008, a laser ray will trace the emissions of the Salmisaari power plant in Helsinki highlighting current levels of electricity consumption by local residents, letting people monitor pollution as they’re …

NZ Notes: Sorry S.P…. I’m leaving you for Antipodes

I love bubbly beverages: Champagne and sparkling water are always my drinks of choice. Among the sparklers, Antipodes stands out. Coming from a deep natural aquifer to the surface in Whakatane, New Zealand, Antipodes has real mouth appeal. It’s less aggressively carbonated than my usual brew, San Pellegrino, and it’s easy on the eyes too. Dressed in classic Mrs. Eaves, Antipodes complements any table without overpowering it. The oviform bottle echoes the round beads streaming up when opened. It’s a happy thing to hold. I know, I know… you have issues with bottled water. I do too. But a girl’s gotta have a vice, and until I can pour sparkling from the tap, I’ll order the bottle. (When out… technically I could make my own at home.) If it makes you feel any better, Antipodes is the first premium water to be certified carbon neutral in production and export, and they plan to be carbon neutral to any table, hotel room or home anywhere in the world by 2008. Antipodes is currently served only in …

Exploring Consensual Hallucinations with Christian Nold

Recommended musical accompaniment: Joga (iTunes | Amazon) by Björk Stockport Emotion Map by Christian Nold, from presentation on “The Human Impact” at Pop!Tech 2007 conference. Christian Nold looks at cities… differently. Most people go around cities with their head down. 50% of people live in them, yet they are more a concept than anything else. Nold posits cities are a consensual hallucination. Historically, maps personified rivers and trees, and activities were embodied within the artful human-scale maps. How can we represent people again and all their human interactions? Nold has been exploring these ideas through biomapping, participatory sensory mapping, for the last 4 years. The first projects began with blindfolding people and having them explore their local area. The main thing they noticed was smells. Now he uses a biomapping device that measures physiological arousal, how are bodies react to the world. Chris Nold’s biomapping device consists of a Galvanic Skin response sensor/data logger and a commercial GPS unit. The data is then loaded into Google Earth. The resulting maps show where people feel excited …

Deep Thoughts with Claire Nouvian

Recommended musical accompaniment: Deep Water (iTunes) by Seal Claire Nouvian sailing in Penobscot Bay for a session on “Oceans in Balance” at Pop!Tech, off the coast of Maine. (More photos from Pop!Tech 2007) Claire Nouvian, a documentary filmmaker, thinks really deep thoughts about the ocean and its inhabitants. She’s especially concerned about how we relate to ecosystems that are far removed from our own. Even though oceans represent about 99% of the planet, they have only been looked at in detail since the 1950’s, and we’ve only sampled about 0.5% of the surface. The ocean remains the last frontier. Nouvian’s journey began in 2001 at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, where she was blown away by an exhibition of “Mysteries of the Deep.” She couldn’t believe the beautiful creatures she was seeing were real and not some computer generated 3D aliens. She set out to tell the world this stuff exists, making a documentary and book. Because the deep sea is remote both horizontally — you have to go over the continental shelf before …

Feel the Numbers with Chris Jordan

Chris Jordan’s concerned that we can’t feel statistics. Our brains aren’t hardwired to deal with high numbers. If we’re going to make radical changes, we have to fall in love, or feel angry enough to do something. His art translates raw data and numbers to the visual language of feeling to help people shift from self-centered consumers to compassionate, connected members of society. Jordan takes digital images and composts them to create massive digital prints that manifest these previously inconceivable statistics. I’ve been admiring his images online for a while, but was fascinated by the power of his detailed prints in person. If you have the opportunity to see an exhibition, seize it. Below are a few images from his latest Running the Numbers series. Detail at actual size from “Jet Trails” 2007, 60″ x 96″ depicting 11,000 jet trails, equal to the number of commercial flights in US every eight hours. Chris took digital images of planes flying overhead, then composted them together. He originally intended to display the number of commercial flights in …

Poptech2007: Oceans in the Balance: Marcia McNutt

Enric Sala, Claire Nouvian and Marcia McNutt in Penobscot Bay, off the coast of Maine. (More photos from Pop!Tech 2007) On a Wednesday session preceding the Pop!Tech conference last week, a group of participants sailed from Camden, Maine through Penobscot Bay on the Appledore schooner with Marcia McNutt, Claire Nouvian, Enric Sala and Ted Ames. Ames, Nouvian and Sala talked about sustainable fishing and ways to encourage resilient ecosystems. Then McNutt spoke up. With dark sunglasses and a hooded black coat shielding her against the wind, the President and CEO of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute looked a bit like the grim reaper as she offered a vivid analogy to understand the impact of bottom trawling and tuna farming: “We clear-cut a forest to catch a deer. Then we feed the deer to tigers, and finally, we eat the tigers.” We’re not just taking the fish out of the ocean, but we’re also destroying the ability to regenerate habitat. Even if we stop trawling the ocean, it may not recover. While the imagery of …

Oceans in the Balance: Ted Ames

Ted Ames smiling and sailing on Penobscot Bay, off the coast from Camden, Maine. (Photo by Emily Davidow; more photos from Pop!Tech 2007) Sailing from Camden through Penobscot Bay on the Appledore schooner, Ted Ames, the only lobsterman to receive a MacArthur Genius Grant, shared insights on the waters he knows so well with a small group of Pop!tech participants. Ames pointed out that the waters we were sailing through had been fished hard and continuously for the past 300-400 years. He shared some big fish tales, showing pictures of a 92 year old halibut over 300 lbs caught in these waters. They used to be rich in cod, winter flounder, haddock, salmon, turbot, orange roughy and other species, supporting 3000-4000 fishermen between here and Canada. The stocks collapsed 12 years ago from here to Canada, and they haven’t come back. Ted knows that fishermen know a great deal about the areas they fish and set out to gather fisherman’s ecological knowledge and map it on a GIS system. They gathered ecological data from when …