All posts filed under: women

links for 2008-02-21: girls love fonts

Polymorphous Perversity I can’t help getting excited about FF Polymorph. This new typeface family by Stefanie Schwarz is inspired by characters from languages around the world. It morphs into 4 styles: decoration, serif, loop and interrupution and also 4 directions: north, south, east, west. Check out also detailed PDF of features and possibilities of Polymorph. (tags: fonts typeface design global typography) NYT: Sorry, Boys, This Is Our Domain THE prototypical computer whiz of popular imagination — pasty, geeky, male — has failed to live up to his reputation. Research shows that among the youngest Internet users, the primary creators of Web content (blogs, graphics, photographs, Web sites) are not misfits resembling the Lone Gunmen of “The X Files.” On the contrary, the cyberpioneers of the moment are digitally effusive teenage girls. (tags: culture gender internet socialnetworking tech web girls women computers)

AllVoices Launches Participatory News Hybrid

I had the pleasure of getting to know the dynamic Amra Tareen last month (over a weekend of women in tech hosted by Mary Hodder) and learn about the exciting development of AllVoices.com Currently she’s in Lahore, covering the Pakistan election and launching the site. Walter Lippmann observed in 1922 in his book Public Opinion: News and truth are not the same thing, and must be clearly distinguished. The function of news is to signalise an event, the function of truth is to bring to light the hidden facts, to set them in relation with each other, and make a picture of reality. Providing multiple points of view by inviting mobile voice and text messages, images and videos from the field and weaving them with local and regional news stories, wire services and blog posts, Allvoices creates context around local events and begins to make a clearer picture of reality. You can see the human dimension of local events with unedited, unmediated news from the street alongside that from multiple media outlets. Everyone can participate …

Links for 2008-01-25: Funky Forest

Funky Forest, interactive ecosystem installation by Emily Gobeille and Theodore Watson Funky Forest’ is an interactive ecosystem where children create trees with their body and then divert the water flowing from the waterfall to the trees to keep them alive. The health of the trees contributes to the overall health of the forest and the typ (tags: interactive installation Art interface digital forest ecosystem education environment socialsoftware water)

The Principles of Uncertainty with Maira Kalman

Mocha cream cake from Maira Kalman’s mother’s bakery on Johnson Avenue in Riverdale, NY (see p.246-247), served at a celebration for the release of The Principles of Uncertainty at the NYPL. Do you engage with pleasure, curiosity, fun and celebration (with time for naps) in the face of the tragedy of the day? Do you want to? This is the book for you. Maira Kalman’s delightful new release, The Principles of Uncertainty, turns out to be a heavy book. Mostly physically. Kalman says it’s because the book is extensively inked: “all the colors are in there.” Even if you’ve been following this year-long illustrated journal at the New York Times, the high-resolution images of her gouache paintings are undeniably gorgeous in print. (Even more so in person at the Julie Saul Gallery through November 24, 2007.) Aside from the inherent pleasures of the portable printed format, the book offers a few bonuses to those already familiar with the images: A pull out “Map of the United States” by Kalman’s beautiful mother, Sara Berman, with instructions …

Deep Thoughts with Claire Nouvian

Recommended musical accompaniment: Deep Water (iTunes) by Seal Claire Nouvian sailing in Penobscot Bay for a session on “Oceans in Balance” at Pop!Tech, off the coast of Maine. (More photos from Pop!Tech 2007) Claire Nouvian, a documentary filmmaker, thinks really deep thoughts about the ocean and its inhabitants. She’s especially concerned about how we relate to ecosystems that are far removed from our own. Even though oceans represent about 99% of the planet, they have only been looked at in detail since the 1950’s, and we’ve only sampled about 0.5% of the surface. The ocean remains the last frontier. Nouvian’s journey began in 2001 at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, where she was blown away by an exhibition of “Mysteries of the Deep.” She couldn’t believe the beautiful creatures she was seeing were real and not some computer generated 3D aliens. She set out to tell the world this stuff exists, making a documentary and book. Because the deep sea is remote both horizontally — you have to go over the continental shelf before …

Poptech2007: Oceans in the Balance: Marcia McNutt

Enric Sala, Claire Nouvian and Marcia McNutt in Penobscot Bay, off the coast of Maine. (More photos from Pop!Tech 2007) On a Wednesday session preceding the Pop!Tech conference last week, a group of participants sailed from Camden, Maine through Penobscot Bay on the Appledore schooner with Marcia McNutt, Claire Nouvian, Enric Sala and Ted Ames. Ames, Nouvian and Sala talked about sustainable fishing and ways to encourage resilient ecosystems. Then McNutt spoke up. With dark sunglasses and a hooded black coat shielding her against the wind, the President and CEO of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute looked a bit like the grim reaper as she offered a vivid analogy to understand the impact of bottom trawling and tuna farming: “We clear-cut a forest to catch a deer. Then we feed the deer to tigers, and finally, we eat the tigers.” We’re not just taking the fish out of the ocean, but we’re also destroying the ability to regenerate habitat. Even if we stop trawling the ocean, it may not recover. While the imagery of …

Current Conference and Foliage Report

This week, I’m excited to participate in Pop!Tech (October 17-20 in Camden, Maine), exploring some of the many ways human beings impact — and are impacted by — the world and each other. The lineup looks phenomenal. The other exciting news is that you can participate wherever you are, as it’s being webcast live. If I wasn’t headed to Maine just as the fall foliage nears the peak and/or was able to clone myself, I would be at: Bioneers (October 19-21) brings together visionary thinkers and doers exploring forefront of human creativity in scientific and social innovation. The conference takes place in San Rafael, CA, but they’re beaming simultaneous broadcasts in many locations this year. She’s Geeky (October 22-23), an (un)conference for women who self identify as geeky and engage in tech-focused disciplines to connect, exchange learning and discuss topics about women and technology. Om Malik points out some other events this week I look forward to following online: Web 2.0 Summit (October 17-19, San Francisco) Mobile 2.0 (October 15, San Francisco): a day exploring …